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I just bought a water softner, what's the hardness of my water?
What are the benefits to Automatic Meter Reading (AMR)?
When do I need a permit?
What does not require a permit?
What if my neighborhood has a Homeowners Association (HOA)?
Can a homeowner pull a permit?
How long is a permit valid?
Why do I need a permit?
Has there been any confirmed sinkhole activity near my property?
What if I’m not sure who to call about the permitting process?
How long does it usually take to get a permit?
Do I need an inspection?
Does the City have a building permitting guide?
Is there parking for the disabled?
Why the need for a paid parking element?
Is parking a problem downtown? I seem to be able to find a parking spot.
Is there a Dunedin resident discount?
Why the change to paid parking? (Limited free parking is still available)
What days and hours are the parking pay stations enforced?
How much does it cost to park downtown?
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Q: I just bought a water softner, what's the hardness of my water?
A:
80-100 ppm (parts per million) or 4.68-5.85 gpg (grains per gallon)
Q: What are the benefits to Automatic Meter Reading (AMR)?
A:
  • Reduction in the meter reading time
  • Easier identification of customer leaks (door tags are left if leaks are found)
  • Ability to provide detailed Water Use Reports to customers
  • Upgrades and replacements where done to your meter during the AMR installation process
Q: When do I need a permit?
A:

The permitting provisions of the Florida Building Code apply to the construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, equipment, use and occupancy, location, maintenance, removal and demolition of every public and private building, structure or facility or floating residential structure, or any appurtenances connected or attached to such buildings, structures or facilities.

Q: What does not require a permit?
A:

• Carpet, vinyl or ceramic tile flooring installation.
• Painting, paneling over existing walls or wallpapering.
• Kitchen cabinets without plumbing or electrical work.
• Ordinary minor repairs may be made provided the repairs do not include the cutting away of any wall, partition or portion thereof, the removal or cutting of any structural beam or load-bearing support, or the removal or change of any required means of egress, or rearrangement of parts of a structure affecting the egress requirements; nor shall ordinary repairs include addition to, alteration of, replacement or relocation of any standpipe, water supply, sewer, drainage, drain leader, gas, soil, waste, vent or similar piping, electric wiring systems or mechanical equipment or other work affecting public health or general safety, and such repairs shall not violate any of the provisions of the technical codes.

Q: What if my neighborhood has a Homeowners Association (HOA)?
A:
The property owner is responsible for adhering to deed restrictions and HOA requirements that apply to the subject property.
Q: Can a homeowner pull a permit?
A:

Florida law requires all construction to be done by licensed contractors. One exception to the law allows an owner of property to act as the contractor with certain restrictions. The owner/builder of a single-family dwelling is exempt from some licensing regulations per 489 103(7) F.S. when building for his/her own use and occupancy, and the owner must provide direct onsite supervision. The owner/builder must appear in person for an owner/builder permit to be issued. It is the obligation of the owner to read, understand and comply with the statute. The sale or lease, or offering for sale or lease of said structure for a period of one (1) year after completion of construction is a criminal violation punishable as a misdemeanor of the 2nd degree.
The owner/builder becomes liable and responsible for the employees hired to assist in the construction project. The law may require the owner/builder to be responsible for the following:
• Workers compensation
• Social security tax
• Unemployment compensation
• Liability coverage
• Federal withholding tax
The applicant for a homeowner permit will be required to sign an affidavit as acknowledgement of the State of Florida requirements.

Q: How long is a permit valid?
A:

A permit is valid for 180 days from the date of issuance, or from the last approved inspection date. If the project is dormant for 180 days then the permit is expired. A permit may be extended only by the Building Official with a written request.

Q: Why do I need a permit?
A:

Per Chapter 1 of the Florida Building Code and section 553.79 (1), Florida Statutes: Any owner, authorized agent, or contractor who desires to construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, demolish, or change the occupancy or occupant content of a building or structure, or any outside area being used as part of the building’s designated occupancy (single or mixed) or to erect, install, enlarge, alter, repair, remove, convert or replace any electrical, gas, mechanical or plumbing system, the installation of which is regulated by the technical codes, or to cause any such work to be done, shall first make application to the building official and obtain the required permit for the work. In addition, permitted and inspected work not only protects the homeowners, but also the neighbors, and creates a more storm-resilient community.

Q: Has there been any confirmed sinkhole activity near my property?
A:

Sinkhole activity is not common in Dunedin.  However, in the late 1980’s, as a result of extreme weather conditions subsidence impacted a number of properties in Dunedin.  Subsidence damage can be caused by many factors including, but not limited to, poor compaction during construction, shrink-swell clays, sinkholes, buried organic debris, etc., but local geology and hydrology play a vital part in most property subsidence. 

The Building Division maintains building permit records that include sinkhole and/or subsidence repairs or remediation.  You can search the records online by street address using the Building Permits Online system.

Q: What if I’m not sure who to call about the permitting process?
A:
If you have permit questions, but you’re not sure who you need, you can always call our receptionist at 727-298-3000, and your call will be directed to the appropriate person or department.
Q: How long does it usually take to get a permit?
A:
Typically residential permits take 3 – 5 business days, and commercial take 5 – 8 business days.
The following are same day, over the counter permits:
• Air conditioning/heating – new installation or replacement for residential
• Electrical upgrade
• Garage door
• Gas – all types
• Miscellaneous building – electrical, plumbing and mechanical for one- and two-family dwellings
• Resealing and striping of existing parking lots
• Residential and mobile home demolition
• Residential generators (drawings for stands or platforms that are signed and sealed by an engineer require review)
• Sewer & water line replacement
• Siding/stucco, soffit & fascia
• Tile or shingle roof replace or repairs (metal roof requires review)
• Water heater, new water softener
Q: Do I need an inspection?
A:
Yes, the Building Division must inspect all permitted work before the permit can be closed out. Please call the inspection line at 727-298-3209 to schedule your inspections.
Q: Does the City have a building permitting guide?
A:
Yes, please see our Practical Guide to Permitting.
Q: Is there parking for the disabled?
A:

Disabled people or persons with valid disabled license plates and/or hanging tags may park for free at any on-street/off-street metered space.

Q: Why the need for a paid parking element?
A:
  • Having paid parking in the most convenient or hot spot areas promotes turnover.
  • Revenue is needed to increase parking stock.  A second parking garage will be required in the near future and a sustained revenue source is needed for any debt obligations associated with building a garage.
  • Revenue also enables the Community Redevelopment Agency to continue to make other enhancements downtown.
Q: Is parking a problem downtown? I seem to be able to find a parking spot.
A:

There is parking today, although at different times it can be difficult to find a spot. The increasing popularity of downtown (a goal of the Downtown Master Plan) combined with leased parking and special event areas no longer being available are creating a crunch on downtown parking availability.  The City needs to increase parking stock by 350 to 400 spaces and parking turnover needs to occur.
The other glaring fact is that a high proportion of the total City downtown parking supply today is considered at-risk in private hands subject to short-term leases with 90 day out clauses.

Q: Is there a Dunedin resident discount?
A:
Dunedin residents can register for a 20% residential discount.
Q: Why the change to paid parking? (Limited free parking is still available)
A:
  • Promote parking turnover
  • Provide dedicated revenue source to go toward a future parking garage
  • Provide revenue for additional parking
Q: What days and hours are the parking pay stations enforced?
A:
7 days a week (from 10 am to 10 pm)
Q: How much does it cost to park downtown?
A:
  • $1.50 per hour for HIGH TRAFFIC on-street lots
  • $1.00 per hour for designated lots
  • There is also complimentary (free) parking in designated lots
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